An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 23

Search Help
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
AIS-HACCP is a self-inspection system for reducing the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species through aquaculture, hatchery, scientific, natural resource, and baitfish harvesting activities. This adaptable way to protect waterways from unwanted species was derived from HACCP methods required for the seafood industry and builds on Sea Grant’s success in assisting industry compliance.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council.

One of the keys to a rapid response to invasive species is the early identification of new occurrences. Please help report occurrences of invasive species in Minnesota. To report suspicious pest species arriving on plants or articles from foreign countries or other states, please contact the MDA's Arrest the Pest. To report invasive aquatic plants or wild animals, please contact the DNR Invasive Species Program at: 651-259-5100 (metro) or 1-888-646-6367.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension. My Minnesota Woods.
University of Minnesota.
IPM of Midwest Landscapes is available for educating growers, landscapers, managers, and consumers in the principles of IPM and its application to managing the over 150 common insect species in Midwest landscapes.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension.
In 2008, the University of Minnesota Extension, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture Plant Protection Division, and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry combined efforts and rolled out the Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program, part of the National Plant Diagnostic Network. Here in Minnesota, we chose to focus on and provide in-depth training for a specific pest, the emerald ash borer, to increase our chances of finding the targeted pest. Since 2008, the training has expanded to include several other pests of national concern.
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.
Are you a crabber, waterman, or concerned citizen? We need your help to detect and assess the status of Chinese Mitten Crabs along the Atlantic and the Gulf Coasts. Recently a new website, Mitten Crab Watch, has been launched to provide information on the invasion of the mitten crab and to allow users to more easily report catches.

University of Minnesota. Extension.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife and Heritage Service.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Do you hike, ride, bird, camp, fish, or otherwise recreate in state parks, forests or wildlands? Lend YOUR eyes to help Maryland's biodiversity! The Maryland Natural Heritage Program designed Statewide Eyes to allow volunteers and researchers alike to collect more information about invasive plants on state lands quickly. Volunteers (like you!) use a free mobile application called the Mid-Atlantic Early Detection Network (MAEDN) to identify, photograph and map the location of invasive plants, focusing on ecologically significant sites.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Forest Service.
University of Maryland.
Beekeepers across the United States lost 40.7% of their honey bee colonies from April 2018 to April 2019, according to preliminary results of the latest annual nationwide survey conducted by the University of Maryland-led nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership. Honey bees pollinate $15 billion worth of food crops in the United States each year. The Bee Informed Partnership team said multiple factors are likely responsible for persistently high annual loss rates and this year’s jump in winter losses. They say a multi-pronged approach--research, extension services & education, and best management practices--is needed to combat the problem. The number one concern among beekeepers and a leading contributor to winter colony losses is varroa mites, lethal parasites that can readily spread from colony to colony. These mites have been decimating colonies for years, with institutions like the University of Maryland actively researching ways to combat them.