An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 20 of 21

Search Help

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.

FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).

PlantPono.org.

The Hawai'i-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment (HPWRA) is a free service that provides a background check on plants. Professional botanists use published information to answer 49 questions about a plant, to predict whether it is a low-risk or high-risk of becoming invasive in Hawai'i or similar Pacific islands.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

Convention on Biological Diversity. Clearing-House Mechanism; Palau Office of Environmental Response and Coordination.

Air Potato Patrol.

The Air Potato Patrol is a citizen science project that involves scientists and researchers with the USDA and the State of Florida and of course you — citizens concerned about the effects of invasive species on our economy and environment. We’re looking for volunteers who are willing to go through our training and report data to the researchers on what is happening to the air potato growing on your property. This citizen science project is open to anyone who wants to help and is easy to become involved with.

Ohio State University Extension; Purdue University Extension; University of Illinois Extension.

The Weed Control Guide, a joint publication from the Cooperative Extension Services in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, explains the importance of weed control and gives suggestions on herbicide management strategies for corn, popcorn, sweet corn, soybeans, small grains, and forages.

Pacific Biosecurity; Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme; Pacific Community.

Pacific Biosecurity; Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme; Pacific Community.

USDA. FS. Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry.

Pacific Islands Marine Bioinvasions Alert Network.

South Florida Water Management District.

Several local and federal agencies today took another step in protecting America's Everglades by releasing an insect reared to combat the invasive Brazilian peppertree. The insects, known as thrips, were reared as part of a joint partnership between the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the National Park Service, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) to combat invasive plants in South Florida's ecosystem.

USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). National Agricultural Pest Information System (NAPIS).
Provides State pest detection contacts, recent state exotic pest news, links to state pest resources, and a list of state CAPS survey targets.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. Center for Plant Health Science and Technology; University of California - Davis.

National Information System for the Regional IPM Centers.

The four Regional Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Centers serve as a hub for multi-state partnerships and communication networks, linking researchers, growers, extension educators, commodity organizations, environmental groups, pest control professionals, government agencies and others. The regions include: Northern IPM Center, Southern IPM Center, North Central IPM Center, and the Western IPM Center.

Funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture to promote IPM, the Centers also coordinate, enhance, and facilitate the flow of resources and information in integrated pest management on a regional basis, including grants management, data acquisition and sharing, infrastructure development, and the documentation needed to provide accountability for resources used. Each regional center focuses on national efforts while maintaining the regional nature required for effective IPM programs.

National Information System for the Regional IPM Centers.

Provides a searchable database for various key contacts, coordinators and experts.

Centre for Invasive Species Solutions (Australia). FeralScan.

University of Florida. IFAS. TAME Melaleuca.

TAME Melaleuca (collaborative effort between U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service and University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, South Florida Water Management District, and others)
Centre for Invasive Species Solutions (Australia). FeralScan.

Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

This guide explains how natural enemies (typically invertebrates and pathogens from the native home range of the pest) can be used to control serious invasive weeds in the Pacific. The use of natural enemies is the most cost-effective method of controlling widespread weeds in the Pacific. It is particularly important in the Pacific context where local capacity to manage such widespread problems is limited. For more knowledge resources, please visit the Pacific Battler Resource Base.