An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 20 of 52

Search Help

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is proposing changes to regulations regarding harmful or potentially harmful fish, shellfish and aquatic plants. The proposed changes significantly reorganize the existing rules to enhance accessibility, meet the changing needs of the regulated community, and address current and potential future threats posed by these exotic species. The proposed rules will be published in the Texas Register no later than Friday, Oct. 2. At that time, comments on the changes can be provided on the TPWD public comment page until Monday, Nov. 9. The TPW Commission will take public comment on the proposed changes at their meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 10 in Austin. Comments on the proposed changes also can be submitted to Ken Kurzawski at (512) 389-4591, email: ken.kurzawski@tpwd.texas.gov.

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

The emerald ash borer, a severe insect pest of ash trees, was confirmed in Webster Parish in February 2015, making Louisiana the 25th state to confirm the presence of this beetle. In 2014, the LDAF started a "Don’t Move Firewood" campaign which is geared toward educating people about the risks of transporting pests to other locations where some can do harm. It is best to purchase firewood not more than 10 miles from where it will be burned.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
The emerald ash borer is a metallic green beetle that bores into ash trees feeding on tissues beneath the bark, ultimately killing the tree. It is not native to the United States and was first found in the U.S. near Detroit, Michigan in 2002. In 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in Granville, Person, Vance, and Warren counties in North Carolina. In 2015 it was found in many additional counties, and a statewide EAB quarantine went into effect in North Carolina.

Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. Bureau of Forest Fire Control and Forestry.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Texas Animal Health Commission.
See also: Poultry Health for more diseases
Texas Parks and Wildlife.
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Idaho Department of Lands.

See also: Forester Forums for more fact sheets

North Carolina Department of Transportation.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) received a report in late June that an invasive silver carp had been spotted in Choctaw Creek, a Texas tributary of the Red River approximately 15 miles downstream from Lake Texoma. "These are the first reports of silver carp from Texas waters, although they have previously been found in other areas of the Red River including just downstream from Lake Texoma in Oklahoma waters in 2019," said Dan Bennett, TPWD fisheries management biologist. "Invasive carp pose a significant risk to Lake Texoma’s ecosystem and boaters and there is adequate flow and upstream river area for them to become established and reproduce in the lake if introduced."

Anyone who catches either silver or bighead carp in Texas waters is asked to report the sighting with location information and photos to AquaticInvasives@tpwd.texas.gov. Silver and bighead carp are prohibited exotic species in Texas and must be killed upon possession by beheading, gutting, gill-cutting or other means or placed on ice. Neither species can be possessed live.

Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.

On August 27, an angler caught a northern snakehead from Reservoir Pond in Canton, Massachusetts. After obtaining and analyzing the specimen, MassWildlife confirmed this fish was a snakehead, an invasive species in Massachusetts. This fish was most likely released by a pet owner when it grew too large for its aquarium. Possession and liberation of snakeheads are both illegal in Massachusetts. Transferring exotic fish into local waterways can cause a host of problems, including competition with native species and spread of disease. This recent catch is the fifth confirmed snakehead documented in Massachusetts since 2002. All snakeheads found in Massachusetts were adults, and MassWildlife has found no evidence of reproduction at any of the locations where the snakeheads were caught.

Anglers may confuse snakeheads with other native species like bowfin. Anyone who captures a fish that can be confidently identified as a snakehead should keep the fish, kill it, and report it to MassWildlife by emailing mass.wildlife@mass.gov or calling (508) 389-6300. MassWildlife encourages anglers who are less certain about the species of fish they have caught to send photos showing various angles of the fish. Under no circumstance should a suspected snakehead be transported to another location until identification is confirmed.

Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Forest Service.
See also: Forest Health Publications for more Invasive Species Leaflets
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Forest Service.
See also: Forest Health Publications for more Invasive Species Leaflets
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Forest Service.
See also: Forest Health Publications for more Invasive Species Leaflets

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Forest Service.

See also: Forest Health Publications for more Invasive Species Leaflets

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Forest Service.
See also: Forest Health Publications for more Invasive Species Leaflets