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Invasive Species Resources

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Hawaii Department of Agriculture.
Hawaii Department of Agriculture.
Boone County Arboretum (Kentucky).
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species; Hawai'i Invasive Species Council; Hawai'i Biological Information Network.
Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
University of Delaware Cooperative Extension.
Plants for a Livable Delaware is a campaign to identify and promote superior plants that thrive without becoming invasive. Visit the University of Delaware's Extension Program for more information on sustainable landscaping.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber. State plant health and forestry officials are providing information, fact sheets, photographs, and links to other resources at Delaware's Spotted Lanternfly resource page. Early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.