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Invasive Species Resources

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Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Marine Invasions Research Lab. National Exotic Marine and Estuarine Species Information System (NEMESIS).
Blue Accounting.
The species watch list identifies species that are likely to have a high or moderate ecological and/or socioeconomic impact if they established in or spread to new locations in the Great Lakes Basin. The watch list was compiled using several regional risk assessment sources and was developed as part of the Aquatic Invasive Species Interstate Surveillance Framework for the U.S. Waters of the Great Lakes.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Invasive Plant Atlas of New England (IPANE).
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Northeast Marine Introduced Species.

Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.

Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Idaho Department of Agriculture.
Includes Statewide EDRR List, Statewide Control List, and Statewide Containment List
Mid-Atlantic Panel on Aquatic Invasive Species.

North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Invasive Plant Atlas of New England (IPANE).
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.

Florida is a national and global hot spot for non-native, invasive species. Because researchers and land managers in Florida have been dealing with invasive species for decades, there is an abundance of resources available to the public regarding invasive species. Sometimes, the volume of available information can be confusing. There are five different primary lists of non-native plant species that are referenced in Florida: 1. The Federal Noxious Weed List, 2. The Florida Noxious Weed List, 3. The Florida Prohibited Aquatic Plant List, 4. The Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) Plant List, and 5. The UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants. This document aims to inform the general public, land managers, researchers, local and state policy makers, and others who seek guidance in accessing regulatory and nonregulatory non-native plant lists in the state of Florida. This publication explains the origins of the lists, meaning of inclusion on a particular list, and ways to access each of the lists.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network.