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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Miami-Dade County (Florida); DOD. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; DOI. National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; South Florida Water Management District.
DOI. National Park Service.

University of Florida. IFAS. Citrus Research and Education Center.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Division of Plant Industry.

Contains fact sheets and other resources for Mediterranean fruit fly, Mexican fruit fly, and Oriental fruit fly

University of Maryland Extension.

See also: Pest Threats for more fact sheets

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
In an effort to keep unwanted exotic pets out of Florida's native habitats, people can surrender exotic pets free of charge with no questions asked. Every attempt will be made to place all healthy animals with experienced exotic pet adopters.
University of Idaho. Extension.
DOI. NPS. Buffalo National River.
On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed the presence of the Longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in Arkansas. The Longhorned tick is an exotic East Asian tick associated with bacterial and viral tickborne diseases of animals and humans in other parts of the world. This tick is considered by USDA to be a serious threat to livestock because heavy tick infestations may cause stunted growth, decreased production and animal deaths. Like deer-ticks, the nymphs of the Longhorned tick are very small (resembling tiny spiders) and can easily go unnoticed on animals and people. This tick is known to infest a wide range of species and has the potential to infect multiple North American wildlife species, humans, dogs, cats, and livestock.