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Invasive Species Resources

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Missouri Department of Conservation.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
DOI. NPS. Buffalo National River.
On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed the presence of the Longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in Arkansas. The Longhorned tick is an exotic East Asian tick associated with bacterial and viral tickborne diseases of animals and humans in other parts of the world. This tick is considered by USDA to be a serious threat to livestock because heavy tick infestations may cause stunted growth, decreased production and animal deaths. Like deer-ticks, the nymphs of the Longhorned tick are very small (resembling tiny spiders) and can easily go unnoticed on animals and people. This tick is known to infest a wide range of species and has the potential to infect multiple North American wildlife species, humans, dogs, cats, and livestock.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department for Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Idaho Department of Lands.
See also: Forester Forums for more fact sheets
Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve (Pennsylvania).
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Governor's Invasive Species Council of Pennsylvania.
Missouri Prairie Foundation.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.
The Emerald ash borer was first found in Connecticut during the week of July 16, 2012. Since that first find in Prospect, EAB has been found in many other parts of the state, particularly in towns in central and western Connecticut. DEEP, the CT Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA APHIS PPQ and the U.S. Forest Service are working together with local partners to slow the spread of the insect and to take steps to minimize its impact. This will be a long-term effort on the part of all involved.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

University of Idaho.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture. Invasive Species/Noxious Weeds Program.

Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign.
University of Idaho Extension.
This pocket guide has color photographs of all the weeds on Idaho's official noxious weeds list. Inside find maps showing each weed's distribution by county, leaf shape illustrations to aid in identification, and features to help distinguish the weeds from similar-looking plants.
University of Missouri-Columbia.