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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Wyoming. College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Blue Accounting.
The species watch list identifies species that are likely to have a high or moderate ecological and/or socioeconomic impact if they established in or spread to new locations in the Great Lakes Basin. The watch list was compiled using several regional risk assessment sources and was developed as part of the Aquatic Invasive Species Interstate Surveillance Framework for the U.S. Waters of the Great Lakes.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.

King County Public Health (Washington).

USDA. FS. Forest Health Protection. Southern Region.

View the updated regional infestation map for Laurel Wilt Disease (for initial detection in May 2002. Map is updated periodically (USDA,FS - Forest & Grassland Health).

Seattle Public Utilities (Washington). Green Gardening Program.
See also: IPM fact sheets for more diseases and pests.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
EDDMapS West provides a means of reporting new sightings of select invasive species in Missouri River Watershed Coalition States, a mechanism for alerting appropriate individuals to the reports, and generates distribution maps for the reported species. Available through the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Invasive Plant Atlas of New England (IPANE).
USDA. NRCS. Pennsylvania.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

The emerald ash borer is a half-inch long metallic green beetle with the scientific name Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larvae of this beetle feed under the bark of ash trees. Their feeding eventually girdles and kills branches and entire trees. Emerald ash borer was first identified in North America in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

Wyoming State Forestry Division.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado in September 2013. This marks the first time EAB has been detected in Colorado as well as the first detection of EAB in any western state. EAB has not been detected in Wyoming. See Forest Health Management for related EAB information.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Fisheries Management.
DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.
See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.
See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets.