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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington Invasive Species Council.
The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states hope the hotline will help them eradicate and curb the spread of feral pigs and provide a better sense of the number of pigs here. See also: Agencies Encourage Reporting of Feral Swine (Nov 21, 2016). The Washington Invasive Species Council, Washington Department of Agriculture, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have issued a news release asking landowners, hikers, hunters, and other recreationists to report feral swine.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Common Disease Problems for more fact sheets
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association
City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Idaho Public Television.
USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
An invasive species is on the move and may be headed for Montana. Palmer amaranth, a giant pigweed, is known to have spread to at least 28 states, including Minnesota and South Dakota, but has not yet been reported in Montana. To prevent its spread into Montana, landowners are encouraged to check their fields to ensure the invasive weed is not present. It was a known contaminant in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) seed mixes but pollinator, wildlife habitat and cover crop plantings may also been contaminated. Producers with recent conservation plantings should check their fields to ensure this invasive weed is not present.
Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
Idaho's inspection stations are placed on major highways at or near the Idaho state line. The purpose of these stations is to inspect watercraft coming from outside of Idaho. Inspectors will look for high-risk boats that have been in quagga mussel and zebra mussel impacted states. Boats will be inspected for any attached mussels and/or standing water and owners also will be asked where they have boated in the previous 30 days. It is important that boaters arrive in Idaho with a clean, drained and dry watercraft.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Watercraft inspections are required. If you cannot get to an open inspection station you can get your watercraft inspected at a regional or area FWP office (PDF | 503 KB).
Montana State University. College of Agriculture.
Missoula County Weed District (Montana).
This curriculum is designed to be a supplemental curriculum for teachers who want to integrate the topic of invasive weeds into their existing courses. This curriculum will provide teachers, educators, and weed professionals with an ecologically-based invasive weed curriculum that assists students in developing awareness, knowledge and skills that will result in responsible land stewardship in the state of Montana.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.
Montana Weed Control Association.