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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Idaho State Department of Agriculture.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Following the detection of invasive aquatic mussel larvae in Nov 2016, the State of Montana's Mussel Response Team was formed to rapidly assess the extent and severity of the mussel incident impacting Montana's waterways. Aquatic invasive species (AIS), including diseases, are easily spread from one water body to the other. To protect Montana’s waters and native aquatic species, please follow the rules and guidelines... clean, drain, dry.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
New Mexico State University. Library Digital Collections.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.

Please complete this form to report a sighting of an invasive species. If you're not sure how to answer a question, do your best and we will contact you with any questions. If you have any questions for us, please feel free to contact us.

Iowa State University.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20. MB)

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
Note: Economics of Damage and Control