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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
University of Idaho; Oregon State University.

DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

USDA. NRCS. Idaho.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
Includes information for managing insect pests of field crops, fruit and nut crops, animals and urban areas; managing plant diseases; and managing weeds of agricultural and other areas.

University of Idaho Extension.

Special Note: Formerly part of the Idaho OnePlan project, which was terminated in September 2018.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Serving the citizens of Arkansas and the agricultural and business communities by providing information and unbiased enforcement of laws and regulations set by the Arkansas State Plant Board.

Boone County Arboretum (Kentucky).
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Kansas Department of Agriculture.

Kansas Department of Agriculture.

Thousand Cankers poses a serious threat to the health of black walnut trees. The Kansas Department of Agriculture, Kansas Forest Service and K-State Research and Extension need your help to help stop the introduction, and to limit the spread, of this disease in Kansas. We are deeply concerned that if it reaches the native range of black walnuts in central and eastern Kansas, we may lose this tree in our urban and native forests.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

Alabama Forestry Commission.

Kansas State University. Research and Extension.
See also: Common Plant Problems in Kansas for more fact sheets
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.