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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service. Chesapeake Bay Field Office.
USDA. Blog.
Key partners and contributors in Napa County, California, recently celebrated and recognized the critical safeguarding accomplishment achieved together, of eradicating the invasive European grapevine moth (EGVM) from the U.S. The keys to success were early detection, our rapid response, and a strong collaboration between federal, state and local officials, growers, university scientists and extension services. Such partnerships remain critical to our ability to safeguard agriculture and facilitate safe trade.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

An interactive story map. The Chesapeake Bay Nutria Eradication Project (CBNEP) is funded largely by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and operations carried out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services. The program is also supported by a coalition of 25 private, local, state, and federal partners which is critical to the success of the project.
See also: APHIS Interactive Maps to explore plant and animal health or wildlife damage management data

USDA. National Agricultural Library.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

USDA. Blog.

Maryland’s eastern shore has seen thousands of acres of protective marshland impacted by the nutria's destructive feeding habits. To protect the valuable resources of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay, The Chesapeake Bay Nutria Eradication Project (CBNEP) began in 2002 to permanently remove invasive nutria from the marshes of the Delmarva Peninsula and to protect, enhance, and restore the aquatic and river ecosystems they damaged.