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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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DOI. NPS. Biscayne National Park.
DOI. USGS. National Wildlife Health Center.
Provides news updates and other resources

Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

Urban legends about the origins of canal grass in Panama abound, but the Smithsonian has new evidence that puts the question to rest. Canal grass is an invasive weed, native to Asia. Because its tiny seeds blow in the wind, it readily invades clearings and spreads to form impenetrable stands by budding from tillers and rhizomes. Once established, canal grass is challenging to eliminate.

DHS. Customs and Border Protection.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists have already intercepted a dozen significant and potentially destructive pests this year at various ports of entry in Florida as part of the agency's all-encompassing efforts to safeguard American agriculture.

Unknown pests pose a significant risk in agriculture due to a lack of knowledge in controlling the pests and the extent of damage they can cause to crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologists recently classified eight pests discovered by CBP agriculture specialists in Florida as first-in-the-nation interceptions and another pest as a new species.

DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.
More than 50 non-native species have found their way to the Galápagos Islands, over 10 times more than scientists previously thought, reports a new study in Aquatic Invasions published Thursday, March 28. The study, a joint effort of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Williams College, and the Charles Darwin Foundation, documents 53 species of introduced marine animals in this UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of the largest marine protected areas on Earth. Before this study came out, scientists knew about only five.

DOI. United States Geological Survey.

The Asian tiger mosquito can carry dread diseases like Zika, and yellow and dengue fever. After it vanished from Palmyra Atoll, an island in the tropical Pacific, USGS researchers and partners set out to find out why.

Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.