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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association

Thurston County Noxious Weed Control (Washington).

Thurston County Noxious Weed Program (Washington).

See also: Noxious Weed Fact Sheets for more species

City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.
Tribal, state and local governments will join forces at Lake Roosevelt this week to combat the spread of northern pike, recently recorded just two dams away from critical Columbia River salmon habitat. “We are at a critical moment in time where northern pike have not spread into salmon habitat,” said Kelly Susewind, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. “If northern pike move downstream, the State of Washington will consider this an environmental emergency. We need to work together to stop northern pike.”

Anglers fishing downstream of the Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams are asked to kill the fish immediately and report sightings to the Washington Invasive Species Council. “We need everyone to find and report invasive species. By being alert and reporting any species that you think might be out of place or a problem, you might be saving us millions in management costs and protecting billions in economic and environmental damages and loss.”
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Washington Administrative Code.
Idaho Public Television.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.
As hunters head into the backcountry this fall, several state agencies are asking them to watch out for noxious weeds, to report any they find and to take easy steps to prevent their spread. State agencies are reminding are reminding hunters that boots and equipment that might carry noxious weed seeds could spread these destructive plants to new areas, damaging habitat and leading to poor conditions for wildlife. Hunters are asked to clean their boots and gear and also to report any noxious weeds they find to help the State inventory these species – especially new infestations.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.