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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Pacific Biodiversity Institute (Washington).
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. Division of Aquatic Resources.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Wyoming Game and Fish Department.
Please check this information before you transport your watercraft into Wyoming as this information will be updated regularly. This site includes detailed information and a map of inspection facilities including locations, dates of operation, and hours of operation. Any watercraft transported into Wyoming from March 1 through November 30 must undergo a mandatory inspection by an authorized inspector prior to launching in any water of the state. See also: AIS Inspection Location List.
Wyoming Game & Fish Department.
All watercraft using Wyoming waters are required to display an Aquatic Invasive Species decal. Costs for the decal are $10 for motorized watercraft registered in Wyoming, $30 for motorized watercraft registered in other states, $5 for non-motorized watercraft owned by Wyoming residents, and $15 for non-motorized watercraft owned by non-residents. Non-motorized inflatable watercraft 10 feet or less in length are exempt. Fees collected for the AIS decal will be used to fund the AIS program in Wyoming along with a General Fund Appropriation. These fees will pay for outreach and education, watercraft inspections, and monitoring to prevent the spread of AIS into Wyoming.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Operators of watercraft not registered in Washington State, seaplanes, and commercial transporters of specified vessel types must purchase aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention permits to help prevent the spread of AIS in Washington. AIS prevention permits are valid for one year and can be purchased online (under the "Other" Product Categories tab) or from any of the department's authorized license dealers. When purchasing online, you may select a preferred activation date. The permit will be valid for one year from that date.
University of Hawai'i - Mānoa. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
USDA. Forest Service.
There are 21 major species of noxious weeds (invasive) on the Black Hills National Forest in western South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming. 
DOI. Bureau of Land Management.
DOI. Bureau of Land Management.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Plant Disease Information Office.
Hawaii Department of Agriculture.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Anyone, including citizens, tribes, organizations, government agencies, and county noxious weed control boards may participate in the listing process by submitting a proposal or by submitting testimony about proposed changes to the noxious weed list. In fact, Washington's open, inclusive listing process is lauded by other states for its encouragement of public participation. Learn more about the listing process here.