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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat.
The Be Plant Wise campaign, launched by Defra and the Scottish Government, is designed to raise awareness among gardeners, pond owners and retailers of the damage caused by invasive aquatic plants and to encourage the public to dispose of these plants correctly. We have developed resources with advice for gardeners and pond owners and are working closely with retailers of aquatic plants to provide information in stores. These pages contain the detailed information you need to Be Plant Wise.

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.
Washington Sea Grant.
United Kingdom Environment Agency.
Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

It is important to stop new outbreaks before they start. You can protect Idaho from invasive species by taking action. By the time an invader is readily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late, resulting in an expensive removal of the established invader. If we detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we can avoid many of the environmental and economic losses caused by invasive species.

Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.

Jackson Hole Weed Management Association (Wyoming).

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (Australia).

The departments of agriculture and primary industries across Australia have proudly partnered with Costa Georgiadis of Gardening Australia to develop a suite of interactive and digital resources which showcase the importance of biosecurity across Australia. Join us on Mission: Biosecurity. As you Watch, Play & Listen, you’ll discover what Biosecurity is, how it can impact our way of life and how we can all help protect our environment, community and economy from biosecurity baddies. ​ Biosecurity – Be a part of it!

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Are you a crabber, waterman, or concerned citizen? We need your help to detect and assess the status of Chinese Mitten Crabs. The "Mitten Crab Watch" website provides information on the invasion of the mitten crab and allows users to more easily report catches.

Please help us detect live mitten crabs by reporting any sighting in North America. We are especially interested in collecting sightings from the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, Hudson River, and San Francisco Bay --- where the crab has been common in the past. Please visit the Mitten Crab Watch website to learn more about the crab and to report sightings.

Portland State University (Oregon).

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Every one in British Columbia can play our part to stop the spread of invasive species and protect our province. By following these simple steps, we can each help protect British Columbia's biodiversity and economy. Familiarize yourself with the following best practices and tell your friends. Together, we can all play our part.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Do you hike, ride, bird, camp, fish, or otherwise recreate in state parks, forests or wildlands? Lend YOUR eyes to help Maryland's biodiversity! The Maryland Natural Heritage Program designed Statewide Eyes to allow volunteers and researchers alike to collect more information about invasive plants on state lands quickly. Volunteers (like you!) use a free mobile application called the Mid-Atlantic Early Detection Network (MAEDN) to identify, photograph and map the location of invasive plants, focusing on ecologically significant sites.

Oregon Public Broadcasting.