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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Washington Native Plant Society.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.
TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.
Washington Sea Grant.
Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

It is important to stop new outbreaks before they start. You can protect Idaho from invasive species by taking action. By the time an invader is readily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late, resulting in an expensive removal of the established invader. If we detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we can avoid many of the environmental and economic losses caused by invasive species.

Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.

Jackson Hole Weed Management Association (Wyoming).

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Are you a crabber, waterman, or concerned citizen? We need your help to detect and assess the status of Chinese Mitten Crabs. The "Mitten Crab Watch" website provides information on the invasion of the mitten crab and allows users to more easily report catches.

Please help us detect live mitten crabs by reporting any sighting in North America. We are especially interested in collecting sightings from the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, Hudson River, and San Francisco Bay --- where the crab has been common in the past. Please visit the Mitten Crab Watch website to learn more about the crab and to report sightings.

Portland State University (Oregon).

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Do you hike, ride, bird, camp, fish, or otherwise recreate in state parks, forests or wildlands? Lend YOUR eyes to help Maryland's biodiversity! The Maryland Natural Heritage Program designed Statewide Eyes to allow volunteers and researchers alike to collect more information about invasive plants on state lands quickly. Volunteers (like you!) use a free mobile application called the Mid-Atlantic Early Detection Network (MAEDN) to identify, photograph and map the location of invasive plants, focusing on ecologically significant sites.

Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington Pest Watch is a citizen science initiative led by agencies and universities at the front line in protecting our state’s natural resources and economy from invasive species. You don't have to be an entomologist or biologist to participate in the network; the majority of network members are everyday people who keep their eyes peeled for the signs and symptoms of high priority invasive species and report them to agencies to aid in detections and rapid response. Just keep an eye out in your yard, your neighborhood, or when enjoying outdoor activities. Be aware and report what you spot—it’s simple and easy.

Benton Soil and Water Conservation District (Oregon).

University of Wyoming; Wyoming Department of Agriculture; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!