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Invasive Species Resources

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University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

San Bernardino County (California). Department of Public Health.

See also: Mosquito & Vector Control for more resources 

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species
Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species
Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Common Disease Problems for more fact sheets.

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

Delaware Department of Agriculture.
A destructive, invasive beetle that kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer (EAB), has been confirmed in Delaware, making it the 28th state to have found the insect, the Delaware Department of Agriculture announced today. Delaware will be added to a federal quarantine already in 27 other states restricting the interstate shipment of all ash wood and wood products - ash nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost and chips - as well as hardwood firewood of all species.

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

University of California. Agricultural and Natural Resources. Kearney Agricultural Center. Citrus Entomology.
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health Division.

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Field Crop Diseases in Arkansas for more factsheets

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Hobby and Small Flock Poultry in Arkansas for more factsheets

USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

White-nose syndrome has been spreading through U.S. bat populations since 2006 and has caused mass die-offs in various regions of the country. The syndrome is caused by Pd (Pseudogymnoascus destructans), a fungus that invades the skin of bats while they hibernate. USDA Forest Service wildlife biologists Roger Perry and Phillip Jordan conducted a study to calculate the survival rates of tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas. The research helps satisfy the need for robust estimates of population data amid the WNS outbreak. The scientists chose to study the tricolored bat because it is common across North America and has suffered substantial declines due to WNS. The research highlights the importance of maintaining and protecting small hibernation sites as they may be critical to the conservation of the tricolored bat species.

Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!