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Invasive Species Resources

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Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive insect from Asia that attacks and kills ash trees, has been confirmed at two new sites in Delaware: one near Middletown, New Castle County, and another near Seaford, Sussex County. Originally found in northern Delaware in 2016, the new detections create added urgency for homeowners and municipalities to determine if they have ash trees on their property and decide on possible management options. Current guidelines recommend the removal or treatment of ash trees if located within 15 miles of a known infestation. Because Delaware is geographically small and EAB can go undetected for years, residents are urged to educate themselves now and take action.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Hawaii Invasive Species Council.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Texas Animal Health Commission.
See also: Poultry Health for more diseases
University of Idaho. Extension.
TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.
Texas Parks and Wildlife.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
USDA. FS. Pacific Southwest Region.
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands.

Delaware Department of Agriculture. Forest Service.

Kentucky Department for Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.
USDA. FS. Pacific Southwest Region.
Idaho Department of Lands.
See also: Forester Forums for more fact sheets
Texas A&M University. Center for Urban and Structural Entomology.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.