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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. 

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) personnel from the Utah Department of Natural Resources (DNR) have stopped more than 120 mussel-infested boats this year, most of which had visited Lake Powell, from launching at other Utah waterbodies. So far in 2018, more than 100 mussel-infested boats have been quarantined, a significant increase compared to recent years. "The quagga situation at Lake Powell has worsened. If you boat at Lake Powell it's very likely your boat has quagga mussels on it," said AIS Program Coordinator Nathan Owens. "With more mussels in the lake and lower water levels more boaters have mussels attached to their vessels than in past years. Our techs are regularly finding them on and in boats that have only been in Lake Powell for a day or two — something we haven't experienced in the past." Boaters that visit another lake or reservoir after visiting Lake Powell will have their boat inspected again. If mussels are found the boat will be decontaminated and quarantined, if necessary.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
See also: Resources for Agricultural Insects Pests for more factsheets
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
In May of 2018, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding of the Haemaphysalis longicornis tick (otherwise known as the East Asian or Longhorned tick) in Virginia. It was previously unknown in the state, but since then has been detected in 24 counties, mostly in the western part of the state. "The tiny tick can appear on cows, horses and other livestock," said State Veterinarian Dr. Charles Broaddus. "In addition to being a nuisance, they also can be a health risk, especially to newborn or young animals." If you believe you have found the Longhorned tick, notify your local office of the Cooperative Extension Service.
Lower Platte Weed Management Area.
Iowa State University. Extension and Outreach.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures. Additional steps are required if you launch on other waters without a significant drying period or if you are on Lake Powell for more than 5 days.

Nebraska Department of Agriculture.

In an effort to slow the spread of the emerald ash borer (EAB), the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA), is adding three more counties to an existing quarantine on ash tree products. Otoe, Lancaster and Saunders join the counties of Douglas, Sarpy, Cass, Washington and Dodge, for a total of eight Nebraska counties regulated under the Nebraska EAB Quarantine. The revisions to the quarantine went into effect Nov. 1, 2018. For more information, see NDA's Emerald Ash Borer page.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln.
Nebraska Weed Control Association.
Nebraska Weed Management Area Coalition.
Nebraska Forest Service.
The Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) has confirmed that emerald ash borer (EAB) was discovered during a site inspection in Omaha's Pulaski Park on June 6, 2016. Nebraska becomes the 27th state to confirm the presence of EAB, joining neighboring states of Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. NDA has issued a quarantine prohibiting ash nursery stock from leaving the quarantine area. The quarantine also regulates the movement of hardwood firewood and mulch, ash timber products and green waste material out of Douglas, Sarpy, Cass, Washington and Dodge counties to assist in the prevention of human-assisted spread of the pest into un-infested areas.
Virginia Department of Health.
In November of 2017, a tick species previously unknown to the US called Haemaphysalis longicornis, or the Asian longhorned tick, was discovered both on a sheep and in a pasture in New Jersey. Since then, this new tick species has been found in eight additional states, including 17 counties and one city in Virginia.

South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks.

The South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) Commission recently finalized new aquatic invasive species (AIS) rules and modifications to the existing rules in an effort to target the most likely ways that these species are moved from water body to water body.