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Invasive Species Resources

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Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
West Virginia Code of State Rules.
Ohio State University. Extension.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife.
Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area (West Virginia).
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20. MB)

University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association
Ohio State University. Ohio Sea Grant College Program.
Ohio State University. Extension.
City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

Mississippi State University.

USDA. Blog.

On September 12, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and its partners declared Monroe Township in Clermont County, Ohio, free of Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). This news came just months after APHIS declared Stonelick Township free of the beetle in March. ALB was first discovered in Monroe Township in August 2011. We think people unknowingly moved the beetle in firewood from Tate Township before anyone knew about the infestation there. Before long, adult beetles emerged and started infesting trees in Monroe. To stop this pest in its tracks, APHIS and state officials had to remove 1,186 trees in Monroe. They protected 4,614 other trees by injecting a pesticide directly into the trunks. It took 7 years, but after inspecting over 177,000 trees, APHIS and its partners finally confirmed the beetle is no longer there.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation.
As part of the ongoing response to the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) within the state, Vermont has joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s 31-state quarantine boundary. The quarantine will help reduce the movement of infested ash wood to un-infested regions outside of Vermont's borders. Ash wood may not be moved from Vermont to Maine, Rhode Island, or 7 counties in New Hampshire because the pest has not been identified in these states and counties. Vermont is also developing a series of slow-the-spread recommendations, initially including recommendations for handling logs, firewood, and other ash materials. To learn more about these recommendations, to see a map indicating where EAB is known to occur in Vermont, and to report suspected invasive species like EAB, visit vtinvasives.org
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).