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Invasive Species Resources

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Rutgers State University of New Jersey. Center for Vector Biology.
Rutgers State University of New Jersey. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Idaho. Extension.
University of Idaho Extension.
This pocket guide has color photographs of all the weeds on Idaho's official noxious weeds list. Inside find maps showing each weed's distribution by county, leaf shape illustrations to aid in identification, and features to help distinguish the weeds from similar-looking plants.
University of Idaho. Extension.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.
Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is a significant nuisance for homeowners and can be devasting for farmers. Learn how to identify BMSB and how to report a sighting of BMSB (in all U.S. states/territories and several countries).

Rutgers Cooperative Research and Extension. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

A collection of photos and descriptions of agricultural weeds found in New Jersey.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
In the U.S., spotted lanternfly is an invasive species that could be very devastating to some New Jersey crops and hardwood trees. In 2018, SLF populations were found in New Jersey and a state quarantine encompassing 3 counties has been established by the NJ Department of Agriculture. People and businesses travelling in and out of Mercer, Hunterdon, and Warren counties should inspect their vehicles for hitchhiking SLF as well as inspect outdoor items such as firewood, paving stones, lawn equipment, etc. for egg masses (see checklist (PDF | 222 KB)). Quarantine compliance will reduce the spread of SLF to new areas and counties thereby protecting New Jersey resources including forests and agriculture. To help survey efforts, please report sightings (with photograph) to slanternfly@njaes.rutgers.edu.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association