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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Maine Department of Environmental Protection.
In 2008, the purchase of a new sticker for owners of Maine-registered watercraft was automatically combined with the watercraft registration fee. The sticker, which now reads "Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers -- Preserve Maine Waters" and is physically attached to the Maine watercraft registration, has been required since 2002 for all motorized watercraft on inland waters. Owners of non-Maine registered boats will continue to be required to purchase and affix a separate nonresident sticker. 
Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Operators of watercraft not registered in Washington State, seaplanes, and commercial transporters of specified vessel types must purchase aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention permits to help prevent the spread of AIS in Washington. AIS prevention permits are valid for one year and can be purchased online (under the "Other" Product Categories tab) or from any of the department's authorized license dealers. When purchasing online, you may select a preferred activation date. The permit will be valid for one year from that date.
Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
In 2016, Nebraska implemented an Aquatic Invasive Species Stamp to fund programs aimed at combating aquatic invasive species. Boaters who register their motorized watercraft in Nebraska will notice a $5 fee added to their three-year boater registration fee. Boaters who register their motorized watercraft in any other state will be required to obtain a $15 Aquatic Invasive Species Stamp each year that they boat in Nebraska. This stamp is available for purchase online. A temporary stamp may be purchased at some state parks and recreation areas.
Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Washington State Department of Agriculture.

The Asian Giant Hornet Public Dashboard shares detection and trapping data. Citizen scientists were able to view detections in real time, including the number of reported sightings and number of hornets confirmed by type. Coordinating this information provided input on future trapping and demonstrated the benefit of collaboration with citizen scientists. WSDA has indicated that citizen data sharing and bottle trapping efforts are crucial to protect Washington from this invasive species.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Parks and Forestry.

Maine Department of Marine Resources.

Austin City Connection (Texas). Watershed Protection Department.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation & Foresty.

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry has announced an addition to the state's invasive species list. Beech leaf disease, leading to the decline and mortality of beech trees from Ohio to southern New England, has arrived in Maine's forests. The disease was confirmed in leaf samples from a forest in Lincolnville (Waldo County) by Dr. Robert Marra of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. The Maine Forest Service is asking the public's help in identifying additional areas impacted by beech leaf disease. If you suspect you have found affected leaves submit photos using the MFS tree ailment form, email foresthealth@maine.gov, or call (207) 287-2431. Photos should include a clear shot of the underside of an affected leaf or leaves. However, please report concerns even if photos cannot be provided.