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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.
TexasInvasives.org.
Zebra mussels are a small, destructive invasive species that can spread across Texas by hitching a ride on boats and trailers. Zebra mussels can cause tremendous environmental and economic damage - hurting aquatic life, damaging your boat, hindering water recreation and even threatening your water supply. In the state's ongoing effort to combat the spread of invasive zebra mussels, new rules effective July 1, 2014 require that all boats operating on public fresh water anywhere in Texas be drained after use.
Texas State University System.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Reporting suspect and/or invasive species is very important! In Montana, where you report invasive species depends on what kind of plant or animal they are, so that the correct agency can respond to your report.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

To prevent and stop invasive species we need your help. You can take simple actions to help prevent the introduction and spread of noxious weeds and invasive species.

Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign.

Nebraska Weed Management Area Coalition.
Texas Citrus Pest and Disease Management Corporation.
Texas Citrus Pest and Disease Management Corporation.
Texas Citrus Pest and Disease Management Corporation.
TexasInvasives.org.
Tell your friends and family about invasive species! Share videos, brochures, photos and other materials. Texas is a big state, and we can't get the word out to everyone without your help. You can either fill out the form to order them, or you can download versions from this website.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council. Montana Invasive Species.

Feral swine are highly destructive and potentially dangerous animals. Biologists describe feral swine as any swine not confined in fences. Their spread is blamed for an estimated $1.5 billion worth of damage to crops, wildlife, and the environment. To prevent the introduction of feral swine into Montana, the 2015 Legislature prohibited the transportation, possession, and hunting of feral swine. There are no known established populations in Montana, although there are populations as close as North Dakota and Saskatchewan. Early detection and rapid response are the keys to success. Eradicating small populations and minimizing the impacts of these invasive species are important to protect the economy and natural resources of the region. If you see a feral swine, report it immediately by calling 406-444-2976.

Texasinvasives.org.