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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 21 to 40 of 103

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University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Invasive Plant Atlas of New England (IPANE).
Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Fisheries Management.
University of Wisconsin.
DOI. FWS. Midwest Region.
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
Environmental Law Institute.
A report by attorney Read D. Porter that examines coordination on aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention among the Chesapeake Bay states. The report focuses on prevention-related legal authorities in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania in particular, and recommends actions to improve regional cooperation both within the existing regulatory frameworks and through potential amendments to state laws and regulations to enhance prevention.
USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.
Provides distribution maps and predicted future range expansion.
University of Wisconsin. Extension.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.
Great Lakes Commission; Invasive Mussel Collaborative.
The Invasive Mussel Collaborative announced today that it has released a new strategy to reduce invasive mussels and their negative impacts. The Strategy to Advance Management of Invasive Zebra and Quagga Mussels is intended to drive investments, policy, and research around invasive mussels across the Great Lakes region and beyond. Since their initial discovery in 1989, zebra and quagga mussels have had dramatic impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, including changes to the food web, degrading fish habitat, interfering with drinking water systems and damaging tourism and recreation economies. Today, these mussels continue to spread to new water bodies across the U.S. and Canada.
Invasive Plants Association of Wisconsin (IPAW).
One of the basic principles of invasive plant management is early detection. To that end, IPAW is sponsoring a reward program to encourage and provide incentive for citizens of the state to look for and report prohibited invasive plants.
Midwest Invasive Plant Network.
Provides information on how to control many invasive plants common to the Midwestern U.S. Information was collected from both scientific literature and expert opinions and summarized by the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN), in partnership with the Mark Renz lab from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
USDA. FS. Rocky Mountain Research Station.
Rocky Mountain Research Station personnel have scientific expertise in widely ranging disciplines and conduct multidisciplinary research on invasive species issues with emphasis in terrestrial and aquatic habitats throughout the Interior West, Great Plains, and related areas.