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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.

Delaware Department of Agriculture.

The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber. State plant health and forestry officials are providing information, fact sheets, photographs, and links to other resources at Delaware's Spotted Lanternfly resource page. Early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

StoptheAnt.org.

Little fire ants (LFA) may be tiny, but they pack a powerful sting. Native to South America, these speck-sized invaders have hitchhiked across the Pacific, hidden in imported goods, establishing new populations in islands like Hawai'i. Much smaller than the average ant, LFA are about as long as a penny is thick. Little fire ants may have reached our shores, but we can't treat it like "just another ant." LFA are considered one of the World's 100 Worst Invasive Species (IUCN Invasive Species Specialist Group), because of their ability to reach very high numbers, to the point where people and animals can't avoid stings. It's up to each of us to Spot The Ant and Stop the Ant. Report little fire ants today.

Illinois Department of Public Health. Environmental Health Protection.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Common Disease Problems for more fact sheets
City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of backyard exhibition chickens in Utah County, Utah. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Utah. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as three of the birds at the premises were recently moved to Utah from Los Angeles County, California. Since May 2018, 299 cases of Newcastle disease have been confirmed in Southern California, primarily in backyard exhibition birds.

Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products.

Utah State University Extension.

Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.

See also: Biting, Stinging, and Health-Related Insects for more species

Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects for more fact sheets
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects Fact Sheets for more species

Utah State University Extension.

See also: Forage and Field Insects Fact Sheets for more species
Utah State University. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Landscape Ornamental Insects for more fact sheets
Utah Weed Control Association.
University of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign. Prairie Research Institute. Illinois Natural History Survey.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Northern snakeheads (Channa argus), an invasive fish, have recently been confirmed in Delaware waters. Three adult snakeheads were collected from the Delaware portion of the Nanticoke watershed: Broad Creek in Laurel, Nanticoke Branch upstream of Seaford, and the Marshyhope at Woodenhawk. The Fisheries Section asks that any possible snakehead catches in any Delaware waters be reported by emailing a photograph and details to edna.stetzar@state.de.us