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Invasive Species Resources

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Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Auburn University (Alabama). College of Agriculture. Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Alabama Invasive Plant Council.
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. Division of Aquatic Resources.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The goal of this project is to raise awareness about invasive species and to turn that awareness into action to prevent and to manage current and future invasions. The project consists of lesson plans and corresponding hands-on items designed to teach the story about invasive species. Each lesson plan has been aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core Standards, and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards. Lesson plans in each module include activities for Grades 3-12.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.
University of Hawai'i - Mānoa. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
Tennessee Valley Authority.
Last year, the TVA found water hyacinth in a slough near Scottsboro. TVA quickly partnered with the State of Alabama, bringing experts from both sides to start addressing the invasive water weed. Water hyacinth is bad news for Guntersville and other great fisheries in the Tennessee Valley. The plant can quickly outcompete other beneficial plants, often creating biological wastelands. Hartis and his team are asking the public to be on the lookout for hyacinth this summer. “If you see a [hyacinth] plant, pull it out of the water immediately and put it in the trash. We don’t want plants to float to a new area and establish a new colony.” If you find a large area of hyacinth, please report it to TVA's Public Land Information Center at (800) 882-5263 (between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Eastern).
Hawaii Department of Agriculture.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.