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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Scottish Invasive Species Initiative.

Here you'll find presentations, activities, worksheets, quizzes, crafts, puzzles and games, all themed around invasive alien species and the river environment which can all be downloaded and shared. There is an introductory presentation to start you off and all activities have notes and answer sheets to help you along – so you don’t need any prior knowledge to use and enjoy them. The activities can be done in groups e.g. a school class but many can be completed individually at home or in the outdoors
Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat.
The Be Plant Wise campaign, launched by Defra and the Scottish Government, is designed to raise awareness among gardeners, pond owners and retailers of the damage caused by invasive aquatic plants and to encourage the public to dispose of these plants correctly. We have developed resources with advice for gardeners and pond owners and are working closely with retailers of aquatic plants to provide information in stores. These pages contain the detailed information you need to Be Plant Wise.

Missouri Department of Conservation.

Invasive crayfish (also called crawdads) displace crayfish species naturally found in bodies of water ("native" species). They introduce disease, hurt fishing, and harm aquatic ecosystems. Our best hope of controlling them is to prevent their introduction to new locations.

Utah Department of Natural Resources.

Quagga mussels are a "SKIFF-TRANSMITTED DISEASE" (STD), and they're a threat to Utah lakes. They’re so small, they could be hitching a ride on your boat without you even knowing it. They’re dangerous and they’re damaging. That’s why it’s so important to prevent spreading them to other Utah lakes.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.
Each category includes relevant educational materials such as powerpoints, videos, and lesson plans that are helpful to educators in any classroom setting.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Missouri Prairie Foundation.

Grow Native! is the native plant marketing and education program of the Missouri Prairie Foundation. Grow Native! helps protect and restore biodiversity by increasing conservation awareness of native plants and their effective use in urban, suburban, and rural developed landscapes.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln.

Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area (West Virginia).

Nordic Council of Ministers. Nordregio.

One of the projects supported by the Arctic Co-operation programme of the Nordic Council of Ministers is launching a major campaign to raise public awareness of the threat posed to the Arctic by alien species travelling with tourists and other visitors. Nordregio takes part in the campaign in its capacity as secretariat for the Nordic-Arctic programme. “Are you travelling alone?” asks an animated polar bear in a new campaign video as he examines some clothes, shoes and equipment belonging to the travellers that step off boats and airplanes that bring them to the Arctic. The video is launched together with travel operators, airline companies, travel agencies and tourist offices that have the Arctic as a travel destination, as well as national and regional authorities to make sure it reaches as far as possible – hopefully unlike the alien species it aims to warn against.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

Prevention and early detection of invasive species depends upon the help of the public, industry partners, and policymakers. The council has helped developed tools and regional messaging that have successfully raised public awareness about invasive species, their impacts on native ecosystems, and the steps people can take to prevent the spread of invasive species. Campaigns include:

  • Buy it Where you Burn it
  • Clean, Drain, Dry
  • Don’t Let it Loose
  • Don’t Pack a Pest
  • Play, Clean, Go
  • Squeal on Pigs!