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Invasive Species Resources

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Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.
Nevada Department of Agriculture.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
If you transport a watercraft on any public highway in Nevada, you are now required to have your drain plugs, drain valves and any other removable device used to control the draining of water removed and open while transporting the vessel. The Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners approved the changes in an effort to lessen the transport and introduction of aquatic invasive species from one waterbody to another.
Tennessee Rules and Regulations.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Tahoe Resource Conservation District; Tahoe Regional Planning Agency; DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Watercraft are the largest vectors for spreading aquatic invasive species (AIS), such as quagga and zebra mussels into new waterways, making boat inspections a vital aspect of protecting Lake Tahoe and other nearby water bodies.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.