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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Lake Tahoe Basin Weed Coordinating Group.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of Nevada - Reno. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Natural Resources Publications for more fact sheets

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

DOI. NPS. Saguaro National Park.
Help preserve the Sonoran Desert by removing buffelgrass, a highly invasive grass that threatens native plants and wildlife populations. Volunteers are needed to assist with buffelgrass pulls, held the second Saturday of each month, from Sept-May.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures. Additional steps are required if you launch on other waters without a significant drying period or if you are on Lake Powell for more than 5 days.
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Nevada Department of Agriculture.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
If you transport a watercraft on any public highway in Nevada, you are now required to have your drain plugs, drain valves and any other removable device used to control the draining of water removed and open while transporting the vessel. The Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners approved the changes in an effort to lessen the transport and introduction of aquatic invasive species from one waterbody to another.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin's recently revised aquatic invasive species (AIS) management plan is now final and available for use by the public after receiving approvals from the National Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Wisconsin last completed an AIS management plan in 2002. Wisconsin's AIS management plan serves multiple purposes, including maintaining Wisconsin's eligibility for funding and directing the AIS efforts of the DNR and partner groups. The new plan also introduces an invasion pathway management approach that will help Wisconsin systematically limit how invasive species move into and throughout Wisconsin. The plan can be downloaded here (PDF | 3.89 MB).

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension.
This booklet is the 2nd edition of a similar booklet published in 2001. This edition includes most of the invasive plant species that appeared in the 1st edition and several other species have been added. The booklet is not intended to provide a comprehensive list of all of Arizona’s invasive weeds, but rather, it illustrates a few invasive plants that have become, or have the potential to become, problematic in Arizona.
Publication Number: AZ1482-2016