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Invasive Species Resources

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Oklahoma State University. Entomology & Plant Pathology.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry.
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. Division of Aquatic Resources.
Oklahoma State University. Entomology and Plant Pathology.
University of Hawai'i - Mānoa. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
Hawaii Department of Agriculture.
University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
Provides general information on pest hosts, distribution, damage, biology, and management in the form of pest summaries.
University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.
Hawaii State Department of Health. Disease Outbreak Control Division.