An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 24

Search Help

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is one of the most serious invasive species threatening our ash resources and forests. All species of ash that grow in Maine are susceptible to injury and death by the emerald ash borer. As of September 2018, EAB has been found in Aroostook Co. (Madawaska, Frenchville, and Grand Isle), and York Co. (Acton and Lebanon), ME. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

PlantPono.org.
The Hawai'i-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment (HPWRA) is a free service that provides a background check on plants. Professional botanists use published information to answer 49 questions about a plant, to predict whether it is a low-risk or high-risk of becoming invasive in Hawai'i or similar Pacific islands.
University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources; USDA. Agriculture Research Service; Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

University of Hawaii. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Hawaii Biodiversity Information Network.

The Hawaii Early Detection Network was created to increase public awareness of invasive species and engage communities in the monitoring of their own neighborhoods. Find out how you help protect the environment of Hawaii by participating in the Eyes and Ears Team and attending an educational workshop or downloading your own field guide. If you are reporting a snake call 911 or for an animal call 643-PEST immediately!

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

University of Missouri-Columbia.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Maine Forest Service. Winter moth was first recorded in Nova Scotia in the 1930s and then in the Pacific Northwest in the 1970's. It showed up in eastern Massachusetts in the early 2000's and has since spread into coastal Maine from Kittery to Bar Harbor. Fill out the Winter Moth Survey to help us gather information about the distribution of these moths across Maine. The results will be used to help with biological control development and other research.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

See also: Weeds - Quackgrass for more species resources
University of Maine. Sustainable Agriculture Program.
See also: For Farmers for more resources