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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Office of Water Resources.
You can take actions to prevent the further spread of AIS. It is essential for boaters and recreational users of lakes and ponds to be vigilant!

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.

Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.

Lake George Park Commission.
From May 1st - Oct. 31st, all trailered boats being launched must be inspected at one of the 7 regional inspection stations.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

The Angler AIS Prevention Pass (AISPP) is required for all individuals who fish in Montana. This program was initiated by the 2017 Montana Legislature to help fund the fight against aquatic invasive species in Montana. Non-resident watercraft launching in Montana must purchase a Vessel AIS Prevention Pass (AISPP). Purchase the Vessel AISPP at FWP regional offices or through the Online Licenses Service.

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

On Sunday, June 27, watercraft inspection stations in eastern Montana intercepted two boats entering the state carrying invasive mussels, making it the 35th and 36th mussel-fouled boats intercepted this year. This surpasses the total number of 35 mussel-fouled boats intercepted in 2020.

Fish, Wildlife & Park staff reminds anyone transporting motorized or nonmotorized boats into Montana that an inspection is required before launching, and stopping at ALL open watercraft inspection stations is required. Failing to stop at an inspection station can result in a fine of up to $500. Many residents of western states, including Montana, are buying boats out of the Midwest or southwestern U.S., where invasive mussels are common. The record number of interceptions is a reminder for people purchasing boats from other states to clean, drain and dry the vessel.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

Following the detection of invasive aquatic mussel larvae in Nov 2016, the State of Montana's Mussel Response Team was formed to rapidly assess the extent and severity of the mussel incident impacting Montana's waterways. Aquatic invasive species (AIS), including diseases, are easily spread from one water body to the other. To protect Montana’s waters and native aquatic species, please follow the rules and guidelines... clean, drain, dry.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

ALL watercraft (motorized and nonmotorized) must stop at ALL watercraft inspection stations you encounter. Inspection stations are the first line of defense to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species.
See also: CleanDrainDryMT.com - Protect Montana Waters from Aquatic Invasive Species