An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 41 to 60 of 381

Search Help

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of Wisconsin - Madison.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets.

Michigan State University. Center for Integrated Plant Systems.

Michigan State University. Diagnostic Services.
See also: Plant Diseases for more fact sheets.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Explains state laws and regulations governing wildlife as pets, including what's legal and what's illegal to own, and why.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.
Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.
Colorado Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.
Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). EAB is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest. Help protect Colorado's ash trees! Don't move firewood, and consider chemical treatments to protect high-value ash trees.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Michigan Technological University. Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences. Center for Exotic Species.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Invaders of the Forest is an educators' guide to invasive plants of Wisconsin forests. The guide provides classroom and field activities for formal and non-formal educators working with kindergarten through adult audiences. Lessons are correlated to Wisconsin's academic standards.
Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council (Michigan).