An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 17 of 17

Search Help
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
These plants are known to be invasive or potentially invasive in Connecticut and are on Connecticut's list of Invasive and Potentially Invasive Plants. They are known to be present only in relatively low numbers at limited locations in Connecticut. These species should be considered for control and eradication efforts in the state when resources are available. If you find these species: Report your findings immediately to the CT Invasive Plant Coordinator at reportinvasives@uconn.edu.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
This guide is intended to assist with identification of invasive plants and provide information on controlling these problem plants. Included are both non-chemical means of control as well as information on proper use of herbicides where chemical controls are needed. The choice of control measure depends on the size and nature of the infestation. If dealt with early enough, invasive plant problems can often be eliminated by non-chemical methods. However, a herbicide-based approach may be required to control an infestation that has become well established or widespread.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
Lake Tahoe Basin Weed Coordinating Group.
California Horticultural Invasives Prevention (Cal-HIP).
Tahoe Resource Conservation District; Tahoe Regional Planning Agency; DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Watercraft are the largest vectors for spreading aquatic invasive species (AIS), such as quagga and zebra mussels into new waterways, making boat inspections a vital aspect of protecting Lake Tahoe and other nearby water bodies.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

Whatisthisbug.org (California).

"What is This Bug" was developed from Farm Bill monies after the need for increased citizen help was recognized in the nationwide fight against invasive species. How can you help? Report a suspected pest. Now, with smartphones and the internet, new, easier and faster ways are available for reporting a suspicious pest, such as the Report a Pest Online Form and the Report a Pest Mobile App.

University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!