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Invasive Species Resources

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California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
California Invasive Plant Council.
CalWeedMapper is a new Web site for mapping invasive plant spread and planning regional management. Users generate a report for their region that synthesizes information into three types of strategic opportunities: surveillance, eradication and containment. Land managers can use these reports to prioritize their invasive plant management, to coordinate at the landscape level (county or larger) and to justify funding requests. For some species, CalWeedMapper also provides maps of suitable range that show where a plant might be able to grow in the future. The system was developed by the California Invasive Plant Council and is designed to stay current by allowing users to edit data.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
University of California - Riverside.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.

University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

ANR Publication 8218

Citrus Research Board (California).

University of California. Agricultural and Natural Resources. Kearney Agricultural Center.
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Freshwater Fisheries Section.