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Invasive Species Resources

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Universidad de Concepción (Chile).
Special Note: In Spanish
Missouri Botanical Garden.
Explore why invasive plants are a concern in the St. Louis region and learn what you can do to help address them.

Missouri Department of Agriculture.

University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.

Cogongrass is one of the world's worst invasive weeds, and is firmly established in several southeastern states. A new fact sheet, Cogongrass Biology and Management in the Southeastern U.S.,  is now available that outlines identification, biology, and management options for cogongrass. If you see it, report it!

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Natural Heritage Program.
Scientific American.
In 1946 the Argentine Navy imported 10 beaver couples from Canada and set them free in Isla Grande, the deep south of Tierra del Fuego, with the intention of "enriching" the native fauna—and the local fur industry. The consequences of such initiative were disastrous: Protected from hunting for 35 years, and devoid of natural predators, the beavers grew over 5,000 times their initial population, caused irreversible changes in the forest ecosystem, and started advancing over the continent. Now, a study published in Chilean Natural History suggests that the demographic explosion of those beavers could be bigger than suspected because it can take years or even decades for local inhabitants to notice the rodents' presence and their impact on the surrounding ecosystems.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.

See also: Weed Management Guides for more resources

University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.

Missouri Botanical Garden.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Boone County Arboretum (Kentucky).
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Missouri Department of Agriculture.

University of Delaware Cooperative Extension.

Plants for a Livable Delaware is a campaign to identify and promote superior plants that thrive without becoming invasive. Visit the University of Delaware's Extension Program for more information on sustainable landscaping.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.