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Invasive Species Resources

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Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
Galapagos Conservancy.
The restoration of Pinzón Island continues following the successful rat eradication campaign in December 2012, carried out by the Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD), in collaboration with Island Conservation and The Raptor Center. In addition to the exciting news of natural recruitment of juvenile tortoises into the population, a potentially new endemic snail species has recently been discovered.
La Plata National University (Argentina). Invading Mollusks Research Group.

Delaware Department of Agriculture. Forest Service.

University of Missouri-Columbia.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.

Reef Environmental Education Foundation.

Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Weed Management Guides for more species
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
Virginia Tech.
North American beavers have wiped out 30 percent of forests along rivers and streams in Tierra del Fuego, a remote archipelago at the southern tip of South America, causing the greatest landscape change to these fragile forests in the last 10,000 years. It’s no surprise, then, that the governments of Chile and Argentina want the invasive beavers gone. But eradicating them has proven to be difficult, researchers found, because it requires the participation of every single landowner in the area.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

The Southeast Early Detection Network (SEEDN) app brings the power of Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) to your smartphone. Now you can submit invasive species observations directly with your smartphone from the field. These reports are uploaded to EDDMapS and e-mailed directly to local and state verifiers for review. SEEDN is more than just a smartphone app; it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for the Southeastern United States that includes the app and the EDDMapS website.

University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.
University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!
Google. YouTube; Missouri Department of Conservation.