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Invasive Species Resources

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Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program.
Much needed attention has been directed at some particularly problematic aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, such as Asian carps and zebra and quagga mussels. But others invaders, like crayfish, can also take their toll on the lakes. Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG) has created a new collaborative that brings together a variety of experts and stakeholders to address the threat of invasive crayfish. The Invasive Crayfish Collaborative (ICC), includes 68 experts and other stakeholders from government agencies, universities, non-profit organizations, and private businesses to combine resources and expertise to address priority invasive crayfish research and outreach needs.
University of Wisconsin Sea Grant.
The Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack is filled with materials to help teach groups about Great Lakes aquatic invasive species (AIS), the problems they cause and what can be done about them. Each pack includes preserved specimens of some of the most problematic AIS in the Great Lakes, rugged plastic fact sheets and a classroom guide. Additional materials are available for download.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
A destructive, invasive beetle that kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer (EAB), has been confirmed in Delaware, making it the 28th state to have found the insect, the Delaware Department of Agriculture announced today. Delaware will be added to a federal quarantine already in 27 other states restricting the interstate shipment of all ash wood and wood products - ash nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost and chips - as well as hardwood firewood of all species.
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network (IABIN). I3N Invasive Species Network. Horus Institute for Environmental Conservation and Development.

Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

The Great Lakes Fishery Commission is now soliciting pre-proposals and pilot project proposals for the 2021 funding cycle. The deadline is Tuesday, January 15, 2020 at 11:59 PM EST. Proposals are evaluated for relevance and scientific merit and against information needs identified by the Research Themes under which they are submitted. Proposals are encouraged to be cross-cutting and address multiple themes. See the theme conceptual diagram (PDF | 172 KB) for examples of how themes may intersect. See Applying for Funding for more information.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.

See also: Chinese Tallow Tree for more resources

International Potato Center.
Galapagos Conservancy.
The restoration of Pinzón Island continues following the successful rat eradication campaign in December 2012, carried out by the Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD), in collaboration with Island Conservation and The Raptor Center. In addition to the exciting news of natural recruitment of juvenile tortoises into the population, a potentially new endemic snail species has recently been discovered.
La Plata National University (Argentina). Invading Mollusks Research Group.
U.S. Government Printing Office. Federal Depository Library Program Electronic Collection Archive.
Compiled and Edited by: Gregory Ruiz and David Reid, NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-142.
See also: GLERL Technical Reports for more reports

Delaware Department of Agriculture.

The Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA) announced today that they expanded the spotted lanternfly quarantine to include all portions of New Castle County north of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. This is due to recent detections of established populations outside of the initial quarantine zone enacted in February 2019 that included eleven zip codes. "This expansion is necessary in our attempt to eradicate, control, and prevent the spread of spotted lanternfly in Delaware and to surrounding states," said Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse. The spotted lanternfly is a destructive invasive plant hopper that attacks many hosts including trees, shrubs, orchards, grapes, and hops. For more detailed information regarding the quarantine, permitting, treatment, or to report a sighting of spotted lanternfly, visit the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s dedicated spotted lanternfly webpage at https://de.gov/hitchhikerbug or call the dedicated spotted lanternfly hotline at (302) 698-4632.

Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.