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Invasive Species Resources

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India Ministry of Agriculture.
See also: CICR Technical Bulletins for more factsheets
Mississippi State University. Extension.
Mississippi State University.
Mississippi Bug Blues is a project that seeks to educate the people of Mississippi about invasive species of insects that pose a threat to our state, its people, and its resources. The main responsibility of this campaign is to educate. Some species, such as the Emerald Ash Borer, have not been found in Mississippi yet, but are a threat because it has been found in several neighboring states. For other species, like the Red Imported Fire Ant, it is too late to prevent them from finding a way into Mississippi, but informing the public about how to avoid such species and control their population are also important.
Missouri Botanical Garden.
Explore why invasive plants are a concern in the St. Louis region and learn what you can do to help address them.

Missouri Department of Agriculture.

University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.
Mississippi State University. Extension.
See also: Publications Filed Under Poultry for more fact sheets
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.
The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) today announced that the longhorned tick, an exotic pest from Asia, has been found for the first time in New England. Working in cooperation with the Animal and Plant Health and Inspection Service (APHIS) of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), DEM is asking livestock producers and wildlife rehabilitators to observe animals for the presence of the tick.
Mississippi State University. Extension Service.
This manual contains three types of activities. First there are introductory, or awareness-building, activities. The second type focuses on both beneficial and detrimental characteristics of exotics. And finally there are activities intended as reinforcers. The best advantage can be gained from this set by selecting at least one introductory activity and several from the second set and following up with routine monitoring of a nonindigenous species in your community.
Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Pest Alerts for more resources
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Pest Alerts for more pests
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Pest Alerts - Fruit Pests for more fact sheets
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
We are currently monitoring these exotic pests as part of the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). If you think you've discovered a pest not native to Rhode Island, and particularly if you suspect the pest to be the Asian Longhorned Beetle or the Emerald Ash Borer, please report it.
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce. Division of Plant Industry.
Missouri Botanical Garden.
Boone County Arboretum (Kentucky).