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Invasive Species Resources

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UNFAO. International Plant Protection Convention.
You cannot protect the environment without also safeguarding plant health. When plant pests and diseases spread into new areas they seriously damage entire ecosystems, putting at risk biological diversity and the environment itself. Tiny and lethal at the same time, plant pests and invasive alien species have been recently identified as the main driver of biodiversity loss. Pests are also responsible for losses of up to USD 220 billion in agricultural trade each year and the loss of 40 percent of the global food crop production. Climate change is making the situation even worse. It is changing the life cycle of pests – sometimes increasing the number of yearly generations - and creating new niches where they can thrive. For more information see the IPPC factsheet "Plant Health and Environmental Protection (PDF | 1.22 MB)".
National Geographic Society.
Nile perch were introduced to Lake Victoria in the 1950s to boost the fishing industry. The introduction of Nile perch caused an economic boom, but almost caused cichlids, a native fish, to go extinct. Discover the role an invasive species can play in an ecosystem and social system.
Centre for Invasive Species Solutions (Australia).
A desire to avoid more extinctions is one of the drivers behind new research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub which has identified invasive species as the no. 1 threat to Australian biodiversity with habitat loss a close second.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

In addition to cleaning the air and water, forests hold a tremendous amount of sequestered carbon. When trees die and then decay on the forest floor, that carbon is released into the atmosphere, a phenomenon that is one of the drivers of climate change. A first-of-its-kind study by a team that included the United States Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service and Purdue University scientists finds that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of carbon stored in trees across the United States. The study, “Biomass losses resulting from insect and disease invasions in USA forests,” is available at: https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/58371.