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Invasive Species Resources

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New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team; Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space.
Includes New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Target & Watch Species along with all Widespread Invasive Species in New Jersey. See also Info Center for more resources.
Western Regional Aquaculture Center.
See also: WRAC Extension Publications for more fact sheets.
Oklahoma State University. Entomology & Plant Pathology.
Japan Ministry of the Environment.

New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry.

Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

Oregon Sea Grant.
The materials found here are part of Menace to the West, an educational resource for teachers, informal educators, parents, and students on aquatic invasive species. These materials are designed to teach K-12 students how invasive species can do untold damage when they move to new territory. Kits, resources, and full lessons are available.
Oregon Sea Grant.
See also: Species Guides for more resources

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

UNFAO. Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.
An insect that can infest and damage hundreds of hectares of maize fields, literally overnight, is sweeping across Asia – alarming smallholder farmers and threatening livelihoods – but the damage can be limited, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reported today. Fall Armyworm is native to the Americas. However, since 2016 it has been aggressively moving ever eastwards, sweeping across Africa, and making landfall for the first time in Asia last summer. Fall Armyworm (FAW) was first detected in India in July 2018 and by January of this year, it had spread to Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand and China’s Yunnan Province.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Parks and Forestry.

Oklahoma State University. Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Rutgers State University of New Jersey. Center for Vector Biology.