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Invasive Species Resources

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Citrus Research Board (California).

University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
Lake Tahoe Basin Weed Coordinating Group.

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

California Horticultural Invasives Prevention (Cal-HIP).
Tahoe Resource Conservation District; Tahoe Regional Planning Agency; DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Watercraft are the largest vectors for spreading aquatic invasive species (AIS), such as quagga and zebra mussels into new waterways, making boat inspections a vital aspect of protecting Lake Tahoe and other nearby water bodies.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

Whatisthisbug.org (California).

"What is This Bug" was developed from Farm Bill monies after the need for increased citizen help was recognized in the nationwide fight against invasive species. How can you help? Report a suspected pest. Now, with smartphones and the internet, new, easier and faster ways are available for reporting a suspicious pest, such as the Report a Pest Online Form and the Report a Pest Mobile App.

University of Wyoming; Wyoming Department of Agriculture; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Wyoming Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!