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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 81 to 100 of 290

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Missouri Department of Conservation.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: Problem Plant Control (scroll to Invasive Plants section) for more information to help you identify and control most common invasive plants in Missouri
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: Problem Plant Control (scroll to Invasive Plants section) for more information to help you identify and control most common invasive plants in Missouri
Missouri Department of Conservation.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
Truckee Meadows Weed Coordinating Group.
Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Provides specific state information on their firewood regulations and recommendations (includes Canada and Mexico).

Sustainable Resources Institute.

This site was initially created by the Southeast Michigan Resource Conservation and Development Council through funding from the USDA Forest Service Wood Education and Resource Center. In 2019, Firewood Scout's management and operations were transferred to the Sustainable Resources Institute, a non profit corporation specializing in natural resource research, education, training and certification. Today, Firewood Scout continues to add new partnering states and to spread the message of "Buy your firewood where you plan to burn it!"

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

First Detector, a program of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), equips a nationwide network of individuals to rapidly detect and report the presence of invasive, exotic plant pathogens, arthropods, nematodes, and weeds. If you suspect the presence of a high-impact plant pest or pathogen, contact a diagnostician and submit a sample for diagnosis.

DOI. FWS. Fisheries and Habitat Conservation.
Through the Service's AIS Program, one AIS Coordinator is funded in each Service Region. This dedicated group of people works closely with state invasive species coordinators, non-governmental groups, private landowners and many others in their day-to-day activities. Provides State and Regional AIS contacts.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

South Dakota Department of Agriculture. Conservation and Forestry.

Forest health management in South Dakota encompasses a wide array of growing conditions, management practices and host species.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Forest Service.
Nevada Division of Forestry.
Kentucky Department for Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Includes information for Mexican Fruit Fly, Mediterranean Fruit Fly, and Oriental Fruit Fly

South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks.

With the discovery of zebra mussels in Lake Sharpe and the high probability of the mussels being present in Lake Francis Case, the Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) Commission added those reservoirs to the list of designated containment waters for aquatic invasive species (AIS) management. The commission also added spiny waterflea, round goby, and white perch to the AIS list in South Dakota. In addition, the commission simplified fish importation rules by allowing for a single importation permit from an out-of-state source to be valid for a year from the importer's last inspection, and to list which fish species need to be tested for specific disease-causing pathogens, as part of the importation process.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
On Tuesday, April 24, Gov. John Hickenlooper signed the Mussel-Free Colorado Act into law in a short ceremony at the Colorado State Capitol Building in Denver. The new law provides a stable funding source of $2.4 million for Colorado Parks and Wildlife's Aquatic Nuisance Species Program for 2019 and beyond.