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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Nevada - Reno. Cooperative Extension.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
USDA. FS. Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.
Iowa Great Lakes Water Safety Council.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
Tahoe Resource Conservation District.
Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
In 2016, Nebraska implemented an Aquatic Invasive Species Stamp to fund programs aimed at combating aquatic invasive species. Boaters who register their motorized watercraft in Nebraska will notice a $5 fee added to their three-year boater registration fee. Boaters who register their motorized watercraft in any other state will be required to obtain a $15 Aquatic Invasive Species Stamp each year that they boat in Nebraska. This stamp is available for purchase online. A temporary stamp may be purchased at some state parks and recreation areas.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment.

The Asian longhorned tick, which preys on a variety of hosts including humans and wild and domestic animals, has been found in Kentucky. This new tick is known to attack animals in large numbers and will be a concern to livestock producers, wildlife enthusiasts and pet owners. The tick has been found in small numbers on elk in Martin County and black bear in Floyd County. It was found in large numbers on a bull in Metcalfe County in the south-central part of the state. Individuals who find a usually large number of ticks on their pet or livestock should contact their local veterinarian. Those who find single ticks they think might be an Asian longhorned tick should work with their county extension agent for agriculture and natural resources to submit the sample to UK entomologists for positive identification.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.