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Invasive Species Resources

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

Clemson University. Regulatory Services.

Clemson University. Regulatory Services.

University of Georgia. BugwoodWiki.
Arizona State University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
See also: Citrus Insect Pests for more factsheets
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
State wildlife officials first discovered New Zealand mudsnails in South Boulder Creek in 2004 and are taking action to prevent them from spreading. The New Zealand mudsnail competes with native invertebrate species and can destroy forage important to trout and other native fishes. Learn more how to identify the New Zealand Mudsnails, how to stop the spread and how to report sightings.
University of Missouri Extension.
Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an exotic, invasive, wood-boring insect that infests and kills native North American ash trees, both in forests and landscape plantings. With EAB now in several areas of the Show-Me State - and its ability to hitchhike on firewood - the probability of it spreading to noninfected areas in the state is high.

University of Missouri. Extension.

Although not yet detected here, thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a potentially fatal disease of black walnut, caused by the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) and an associated fungus (Geosmithia morbida). TCD could easily spread to Missouri from the several eastern and western states where TCD is already present. You can help minimize the chances of spreading TCD by following these steps:
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of pet chickens in Coconino County, Arizona. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Arizona. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as tests show the virus is almost identical to the virus causing disease in California. Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products. In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian or to State veterinary officials. Additional information on biosecurity for all poultry flocks can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Saltwater Recreational Fishing License Program.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
DOI. NPS. Mammoth Cave National Park.
Bats are dying. Please help us protect them. A disease called white-nose syndrome (WNS) is spreading through the eastern United States, killing bat populations. White-nose syndrome is considered to be present in the Mammoth Cave System. It is believed that humans may contribute to the spread of white-nose syndrome by visiting contaminated caves or mines and then wearing the same clothing or carrying the same objects to unaffected caves or mines, transporting spores from one place to the other. You can help us save bats by following a few simple guidelines.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculturel, Food, and Environment. Department of Forestry and Natural Resources.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Aquatic Nuisance Species Program.