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Invasive Species Resources

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Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
This guide contains a collection of hands-on activities that are easy for teachers to use in the classroom and in the schoolyard. The curriculum is designed for kindergarten through 12th grade and most activities are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards. The guide is available to all formal and non-formal educators online at www.gaeppc.org and through workshops offered in the metro-Atlanta area. Classroom teachers, park naturalists, environmental education specialists, and others can adapt these activities to fit easily into their programs.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
New state regulations to help prevent the spread of quagga mussels and zebra mussels went into effect in Mar 2010. These regulatory measures, known as "Director's Orders," were authorized by the Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction Act passed by the Arizona Legislature in 2009. The orders contain a list of aquatic invasive species for Arizona, a list of waters where aquatic invasive species are present, and mandatory conditions for the movement of watercraft.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for additional risk analyses and related species information
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
The Arizona Invasive Species Advisory Council was created in April 2005 by Governor Napolitano to address the challenges that invasive species pose for the state’s natural areas and wildlife.
University of Arizona; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Arizona Department of Agriculture.
The Arizona Plant Diagnostic Network is designed to link growers and master gardeners with plant experts in your community and with plant scientists at the University of Arizona. These experts are available to answer questions about plant health and help identify new and emerging plant pests and pathogens in Arizona. The goal is to increase public awareness of incoming threats to the plants and produce in our State.

University of Arizona; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Arizona Department of Agriculture.

This list of the most serious biotic pests and pathogens is maintained by the State (Arizona Department of Agriculture) and Federal (USDA) regulatory agents. Their goal is to prevent the introduction and/or spread of these pests/pathogens in our state.

Arizona Department of Agriculture.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.