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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Nevada - Reno. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Agriculture Publications for more fact sheets
USDA. FS. Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
Tahoe Resource Conservation District.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).
Lake Champlain Land Trust.
DOI. Bureau of Land Management.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
University of Vermont. Forest Pathology.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Freshwater Fisheries Section.