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Invasive Species Resources

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Ohio Department of Agriculture.

University of Missouri-Columbia.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

Ohio State University Extension; Purdue University Extension; University of Illinois Extension.

The Weed Control Guide, a joint publication from the Cooperative Extension Services in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, explains the importance of weed control and gives suggestions on herbicide management strategies for corn, popcorn, sweet corn, soybeans, small grains, and forages.

Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
USDA. Blog.
On September 12, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and its partners declared Monroe Township in Clermont County, Ohio, free of Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). This news came just months after APHIS declared Stonelick Township free of the beetle in March. ALB was first discovered in Monroe Township in August 2011. We think people unknowingly moved the beetle in firewood from Tate Township before anyone knew about the infestation there. Before long, adult beetles emerged and started infesting trees in Monroe. To stop this pest in its tracks, APHIS and state officials had to remove 1,186 trees in Monroe. They protected 4,614 other trees by injecting a pesticide directly into the trunks. It took 7 years, but after inspecting over 177,000 trees, APHIS and its partners finally confirmed the beetle is no longer there.
University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!
Google. YouTube; Missouri Department of Conservation.