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Invasive Species Resources

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Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

See also: Weeds - Quackgrass for more species resources
University of Maine. Sustainable Agriculture Program.
See also: For Farmers for more resources
Maine Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.
USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
NRCS offers technical and financial assistance to help farmers, ranchers and forest managers.

National Information System for the Regional IPM Centers.

Provides various key contacts, coordinators and experts.

DOC. NOAA. National Sea Grant Office.
Provides contact information for State Sea Grant Programs Websites. The Sea Grant Directors lead the 33 Sea Grant programs, the National Sea Grant Law Center, and the National Sea Grant Library based at top universities in every coastal and Great Lakes state, Puerto Rico, and Guam, working to bring the robust intellectual capacity in place at these universities to bear on important societal problems. They coordinate program activities, setting local, regional and national priorities, and work as part of a national network to help citizens and businesses understand, conserve and better utilize America’s coastal, ocean and Great Lakes resources.
Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

University of Missouri Extension.

University of Missouri. Extension.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
DOI. FWS. Fisheries and Habitat Conservation.
Provides aquatic invasive species contact(s) for each state.
USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.
State Plant Health Directors (SPHD) direct federal APHIS-PPQ pest detection and regulatory activities in cooperation with state officials. SPHDs coordinate the initial PPQ emergency response if an exotic pest is detected in the state. To report a pest, contact your local APHIS office or call USDA Customer Service toll free at 1-844-820-2234 (Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Eastern).
National Plant Board.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine Program (USDA, APHIS, PPQ) and the plant health agencies in each of the 50 states, regulate the shipment of nursery and greenhouse stock in an effort to minimize the spread of harmful insects, diseases, and other pests. The Federal & State Quarantine Summaries is designed as a reference tool for nursery stock growers, brokers, purchasers, and others involved in the buying selling, and interstate transport of nursery and greenhouse plant crops. It outlines the basic quarantine and other plant health requirements of APHIS, all 50 states, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and Guam. The information presented here is designed as an aid to help users avoid costly delays, rejections of plant material shipments, and introduction of harmful pests into new areas.
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
State wildlife action plans outline the steps that are needed to conserve wildlife and habitat before they become more rare and more costly to protect. Taken as a whole, they present a national action agenda for preventing wildlife from becoming endangered.
See also: A national look at Species of Greatest Conservation Need as reported in State Wildlife Action Plans (DOI, USGS)
Environmental Law Institute.
This report reviews developments in state laws and regulations governing invasive species in eleven states. It finds that invasive species laws and regulations are often fragmented and incomplete and have developed primarily on a species-by-species basis in response to crisis. As a result, they often fail to address potential future invaders or close off known invasion pathways. Fortunately, states have begun regulating invasion pathways and identifying species that may become invasive in the future due to climate change or other factors. States are increasingly creating interagency councils and management plans to coordinate these novel invasive species responses.
Nature Conservancy.
The Nature Conservancy works across state borders to preserve natural areas throughout the United States. And, the Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.
City of Bowling Green (Kentucky).
Missouri Invasive Forest Pest Council.